Keep your clothes smelling fresh!

Many people have limited storage space and lots of clothes. It makes sens to store your summer or winter wardrobe away when you're not wearing it. That way you have a much more organized closet. Here are some tips on how to keep your favorite items fresh and looking as new!

A few weeks ago we shared our green laundry tips on how to wash your clothes without exposing them to harmful chemicals or bleach. Today we'll share a few tips on how to keep your clothes fresh when not doing laundry. There are some great natural solutions to keeping your favorites moth free and smelling lovely even when you're not wearing them.

We have been referring housecleaning services to families and busy professionals in the San Francisco Bay Area for many years now. You can be sure that we know our customers and their needs very well. And what do all San Franciscans have in common? Little space, especially closet space!

Multifunctional furniture and smart room layouts are highly desirable in this city, and avoiding clutter in our small habitats is essential for stress reduction (check out our step by step guide toward a clutter-free life!) Part of managing small spaces and little storage is to be smart about where to store your items. Usually the rule is to store according to use. Everything you need regularly throughout the week or the day should be easily accessible. Other items can be stored vertically, either up in a tall cupboard, shelf or closet, or below inside a bench or under the bed.

This is especially true for clothes. Most of us usually have a summer wardrobe and a winter wardrobe, and it makes a lot of sense to rotate limited storage space between the two wardrobes. That way your closet is not a mess of clothes stuffed together, but can remain beautifully organized. That's not just a matter of esthetics but can save us a lot of time and headache when getting dressed in the morning. But when we store away our summer or winter wardrobe in small storage spaces, we have to make sure they remain fresh and moth free.

When clothes are not stored on hangers and well aired, they tend to get a little musky after some time. We all know that vintage item smell, and that's not what you want. Worse, many items can be permanently damaged when not stored away correctly, either because of moth holes of from mold in damp spaces. Many conventional products like moth balls or dryer sheets that are often used in these cases can however be very toxic and actually leave your clothes with a strong chemical smell.

Natural alternatives to combat bad smells, muskiness, dampness and moths are abundant, convenient, cheap and often much better. Here is a a quick list of some of the best natural ways of keeping your clothes fresh:

1. Lavender: this plant from the mint family is known for its pleasant, strong and lasting fragrance. It's easy to make small pockets or cushions filled with dry lavender and stick them between neatly folded clothes. Good to know: placing these lavender bags under your pillow can help you relax and sleep better.

2. Cedar: this fragrant wood is a natural moth repellent and also absorbs other abrasive odors. You can buy premade cedar blocks or drizzle cedar oil on a small pouch to store with your clothes.

3. Chalk: this natural hidden gem absorbs moisture and is great for damper storage areas such as basements, where it will fight musky smells created by moisture.

4. Baking Soda: this really seems to be one of those magic ingredients that work on and for everything. If you leave a small opened pack of Baking Soda in your fridge, you already know all about its odor fighting qualities. But did you know it also fights mold and mildew?

All these natural and easy to find super ingredients can come in very handy when storing away your favorite sweaters over the summer months. For more natural alternatives to keeping your clothes smelling clean and fresh, we also love these five tips that avoid chemical softeners.

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